Tag Archives: Podcast

Maggie Beattie Roberts on Being Your Favorite Teacher

Heinemann author Maggie Beattie Roberts is our guest today on The Heinemann Podcast. I’m sure you think about your favorite teacher from time to time, but what can our memories do to inform our teaching? Heinemann Author Maggie Beattie Roberts thinks we can use these influences to help form teaching archetypes to better our practice. 

Maggie Beattie Roberts began her teaching career in the heart of Chicago and then pursued graduate studies as a Literacy Specialist at Teachers College at Columbia University. She worked as a staff developer for the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project for nearly ten years, where she led research and development in digital and media literacy, as well as differentiated methods of teaching. Maggie is currently a national literacy consultant, author and frequent presenter at national conferences. She is the co-author of DIY Literacy, and co-authored several Heinemann Unit of Study books on the teaching of writing.

Continue reading

Play

A Special NCTE-Edition Heinemann Podcast Roundup

NCTE17 Heinemann Podcast Roundup

Overwhelmed by the sheer number of inspiring Heinemann authors who attended this year's National Council of Teachers of English conference? So are we– in the best way. Whether you were able to attend the conference or not, below we've compiled some of our favorite Heinemann podcasts with authors who presented at this year's NCTE so you can listen from anywhere to learn more. Enjoy! 

Continue reading

Supporting Struggling Learners with Patricia Vitale-Reilly

Supporting Struggling LearnersOn today’s Heinemann Podcast, Supporting Struggling Learners. How do we meet the needs of all our students while also meeting the demands of the curriculum? Every learner has strengths, writes Patricia Vitale-Reilly. She goes on to say, upon those strengths is where growth can occur. In her new book, Supporting Struggling Learners, Patty outlines 50 instructional moves for the classroom teacher. These moves that can be applied across subjects and grades. Patty walks us through how to make a positive impact on student thinking and learning. We started our conversation on the instructional moves to help make a more inclusive culture in the classroom.

Play

Continue reading

Supporting LGBTQ Students and Teachers

Heinemann Podcast_H-podcast-logo-bluerules2400x2400_WToday on The Heinemann Podcast, how can teachers improve their practice around LGBTQ needs in the classroom? It’s October 11th, National Coming Out Day. A day for those who identify as LGBTQ to be visible. A day to say you matter, you’re not alone. How can educators make their classrooms a safer place for LGBTQ students and why is it important for both LGBTQ teachers and students to see schools as a safe place? Heinemann author Kate Roberts and Heinemann Fellow Jess Lifshitz talk more about the importance for our classrooms to be safe places. 

Play

Continue reading

Take Charge of your Teaching Evaluation with Jennifer Ansbach

Ansbach Take Charge of Your Teaching EvaluationOn today’s Heinemann Podcast, taking charge of your teaching evaluation. Evaluations can feel like a one-way street, with teachers feeling powerless. It doesn't have to be that way, Author Jennifer Ansbach writes about how we can take charge of evaluations by keeping the focus on student learning. In her new book, Take Charge of your Teaching Evaluation, she writes about the story of your practice. 
 
We started out asking her what she means by that and why our story of practice is so important?

Play

Continue reading

Embarrassment And the Emotional Underlife of Learning By Tom Newkirk

Embarrassment by Tom NewkirkOn today’s Heinemann podcast: Embarrassment. 

We’ve all been there. In the dead of night, lying awake, replaying that one moment over and over again in our minds. The daily mistakes we make, both large and small, are part of what make us human, and yet, are often impossible to forgive ourselves for. In his new book, Embarrassment, Tom Newkirk writes, "We perform for ourselves, often the harshest of audiences.”  But how does embarrassment affect our professional lives as teachers, and how does it affect students?  Tom would argue that it is the true enemy of learning, keeping teachers and students alike silent, hesitant, and afraid. So how do we get past our anxiety, our panic, and defensiveness and become more generous to ourselves? How do we teach our students to take the risk of asking for help, or just to raise their hand in the classroom? 

Continue reading

Play