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Dedicated to Teachers


Teaching Writers to Remember Their Practice

When we say we teach students to remember, we mean we support students as they recall and retell—with specificity—what happened in their writing practice.  (continue reading)

Creating A Culture of Collaboration

To foster a conversation and culture of collaboration, it is vital that assignments not be treated as though they were written in stone. How could they be when the kids and conditions we work with change so much each year?  (continue reading)

Making a Case for Reflection

When student writers know how to reflect, they know how to learn from their writing experiences. It’s one thing to experience something, but if the experience is then forgotten or not connected in any direct way to other experiences, how is it useful?  (continue reading)

On the Podcast: Fiction Unbound with Tom Newkirk

Today on the Heinemann podcast author Tom Newkirk explores the value of creating worlds through fiction writing. As Tom says, “our minds were made for stories,” so he decided to sit down with high school students to hear about the fiction they write in and out of school…  (continue reading)

On the Podcast: Teaching Writers to Reflect with Anne Whitney, Colleen McCracken, and Deana Washell

Today on the podcast, we’re talking with Anne Whitney, Colleen McCracken, and Deana Washell, co-authors of “Teaching Writers to Reflect: Strategies for a More Thoughtful Writing Workshop.”  (continue reading)

On the Podcast: Modeling Conferences as Conversations with Katie Wood Ray, Jennifer Serravallo, and Carl Anderson

Today on the Heinemann Podcast, author and editor Katie Wood Ray interviews Carl Anderson and Jenifer Serravallo, who both recently published two conferring books in Heinemann’s Classroom Essentials Series.  (continue reading)

Teaching Writers to Reflect: A Foreword from Katie Wood Ray

Some children, no doubt, are just naturally reflective. I don’t doubt that much of Lucas’ thoughtfulness about his work was just part of who he is. But all children— and adults for that matter—can be taught to be more reflective.  (continue reading)

Making Writing Assignments Accessible to Our Students

The overall design of an academic assignment, from the layout to the words used, is critical to not only how well a student preforms, but how they continue to learn throughout their academic journey. By taking a user approach, Jim Burke suggests that we can design better work for our students.  (continue reading)

Crossing the Creative Desert

There is a better way than teaching to district assessments and high-stakes college entrance exams. Though we may have to teach a type of formulaic writing, we don’t have to abandon the work that truly matters to our students.  (continue reading)

Empowering Students to Lead with Ownership and Independence Across Our Workshops, K-8

At this point in the year, it’s important to take stock of how your students are progressing toward independence and whether it would be helpful to shine a light on this all-important focus.  (continue reading)

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