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Dedicated to Teachers


Demonstration Teaching in Writing Workshop

A good demonstration is specific, focused, and clear. Thinking aloud while demonstrating is an important way to show not just what we are doing but also how we are doing it. Modeling is not the same as demonstrating. Modeling is an important part of high-quality teaching, but in a focused strategy lesson, demonstrating is more effective.  (continue reading)

Co-Create Charts with Students

How can we actively and intentionally involve students in the chart-making process so charts become an integral part of instruction? Let’s take a look at one way to involve students through the use of interactive writing.  (continue reading)

Increase Opportunities for Talk in the Math Classroom

The more opportunities students have to practice using the language of mathematics through conversation, the deeper their understanding will be. As students engage in brief discussion, they have the chance to hear and practice providing explanations, multiple representations, and solutions.  (continue reading)

Feedback That Feeds

There are so many instructional opportunities when conferring with students: we can nudge readers and writers to clarify thinking, address a need through teaching points, model for students what it looks like to use literacy to make sense of the world — and so much more.  (continue reading)

What You Need to Know About Professional Learning: 10 Essentials for Becoming a More Effective Teacher

I’ve been teaching and learning how to be a more effective teacher for most of my adult life. One thing I know for sure. Of all the factors that predict how well K-12 students do in learning to critically read, write and think, ongoing professional learning is the most vital. In fact, student learning and teacher expertise are inseparable.  (continue reading)

Using a Strategy Group to Support Writers

One of the hardest things about writing is—getting started! For many of our students, drawing and talking about their drawings is just what they need to cross the barrier from a blank page to page filled with their words.  (continue reading)

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