Your Weekly Link Round-Up for the week of July 31-Aug. 5

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These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Steve Zemelmann blogged about helping teachers overcome obstacles to student civic action projects 

Project-based learning with civic action is so vital to the development of active citizens in our communities that teachers need to find ways to include them in their classrooms even when there are challenges to overcome. Here are some of the obstacles, and ways to surmount them.

Read the rest of his post here

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This past Sunday through Wednesday Kylene Beers and Bob Probst once again led the Pacific Coast Literacy Institute along with distinguished core faculty Chris Crutcher, Penny Kittle, and Linda Rief

Check in with #paclit here on Twitter to catch up with what went on during the institute

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Both Donalyn Miller and Penny Kittle  tweeted out an article from The Atlantic discussing the problem that many poor children in urban areas face: there just isn't much around for kids to read. 

This disparity is well-documented. It’s the subject of myriad news stories and government programs, as well as the Clinton Foundation’s "too Small to Fail Initiative", all of which send the message that low-income parents should talk and read to their children more. But these efforts to close the “word gap” often overlook a fundamental problem. In high-poverty neighborhoods, books—the very things that could supply so many of those 30 million-plus words—are hard to come by. In many poor homes, they’re nonexistent. 

You can read the entire article here

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Kwame Alexander hung out with Lucy Calkins at Teachers College Reading and Writing Project (via Twitter)

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This past Saturday, Heinemann opened its doors to teachers for the fourth annual Teacher Tour. Visiting teachers were welcomed by our S.V.P. and G.M., Vicki Boyd, and were then escorted through the historic Heinemann home office to attend four different 40-minute sessions given by authors Kate Roberts, Kristine Mraz and Christine Hertz, Donalyn Miller and Teri Lesesne, and Sonja Cherry-Paul and Dana Johansen

You can relive all the fun with us here, where you'll find videos of all four sessions, twitter coverage and photos. 

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Over on the Heinemann Medium page, teacher-consultants Kylene Beers and Bob Probst discuss 5 ideas about teaching nonfiction that will change your teaching

If we teach kids that nonfiction purports to gives us reliable, truthful information, then readers have a job. They must critically examine the author’s words, look for bias and evidence, and question the author’s purpose and motive.

Click through to read the entire post

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That's it! Be sure to check back next week for another round of links. If you have a link or a blog, be sure to mention them in the comments below. You can also email them to us or tweet at us. We're pretty available over here. Cheers to your weekend!

*Photo by Michael Browning

 

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