Tag Archives: Video

PLC Series: Making Shifts in Our Inner Voices

Welcome back to the Heinemann Professional Development Professional Learning Community (PLC) series.

Each month, we share 2 posts designed to provoke thinking and discussion, through a simple framework, incorporating mini-collections of linked content into your professional development time. 

This month, our posts will help us build understanding of mindsets and practices that support positive school culture where whole-person learning and growth are honored for teachers and students alike.

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“I believe we internalize the voices—those that help and those that inhibit—from encounters with teachers, parents, coaches, friends, as well as detractors and critics.” –Tom Newkirk

Take a moment to think, write, or talk about the internalized voice you hear most often.  How does it help or inhibit progress for your daily challenges? How does it impact your choices, your energy level, or your work as an educator?



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Amy Ludwig VanDerwater on The Many Uses of Poetry

Poems Are Teachers book cover

"Poems explore everything. You can go anywhere," explains Amy VanDerwater, author of Poems Are Teachers . In her new book, VanDerwater argues that poems should be the backbone of writing instruction, instead of being swept under the carpet as an afterthought. She shows us that there is a poem for every kind of life experience, big or small. 

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PLC Series: Turn Inquiry into Action

Welcome back to the Heinemann Professional Development Professional Learning Community (PLC) series. We hope you are enjoying our new format for the 2017-2018 year! 

Each month, we share 2 posts designed to provoke thinking and discussion, through a simple framework, incorporating mini-collections of linked content into your professional development time. 

This month, our posts will invite us to welcome curiosity, inquiry, and action for our classrooms and school communities. 

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The power of technology allows us to easily act on a connection with stories, supporting projects or organizations linked to meaningful causes. A simple scroll through social media allows you to hear a plea for help and give with a simple click of a button.

Think of any causes you supported in the past few years. Was it to grow research? Raise awareness? Crowdsource funding? Why did you make these choices? Did the story touch you? Have you or a family member found yourself in a similar position of need?


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Tom Newkirk on The Emotional Complexities of Teaching

Tom Newkirk Embarrassment book cover

"I'll go first", says Thomas Newkirk in his new book, Embarrassment and the Emotional Underlife of Learning. Through sharing his own stories of frustration and the performative anxieties of teaching, Newkirk sheds light on his emotional journey as an educator. He opens a discussion about the emotional realities of teaching by delving into a newfound discussion space. 

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PLC Series: Inquiry Honors Student Thinking

Welcome back to the Heinemann Professional Development Professional Learning Community (PLC) series. We are excited to present a new format for the 2017-2018 year! 

Each month, we'll share 2 posts designed to provoke thinking and discussion, through a simple framework, incorporating mini-collections of linked content into your professional development time. 

This month, our posts will invite us to welcome curiosity, inquiry, and action for our classrooms and school communities. 

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“It's called "wayfinding"… it's not just sails and knots, it's seeing where you're going in your mind. Knowing where you are by knowing where you've been.”  —Maui in Disney’s Moana (2016)
 

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To understand how to authentically bring the cycle of inquiry to your students, we need to reflect upon how this process looks in our adult lives. What types of questions do we ask? When? Where do we go for information? How do we deal with roadblocks? What does it look like to synthesize and share what we learned?

Jot down a memory you have where you wondered something specific and pursued an answer a question—could be a two-minute Google search or a longer-term experience. Be sure to list how you investigated (alone, with others, online, print material etc), how you determined which information was relevant, important, and valid, and then what did you do with it. Did you post on social media? Write about it? Call someone? Simply exhale and move on?

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