Tag Archives: Video

Tom Newkirk on The Emotional Complexities of Teaching

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"I'll go first", says Thomas Newkirk in his new book, Embarrassment and the Emotional Underlife of Learning. Through sharing his own stories of frustration and the performative anxieties of teaching, Newkirk sheds light on his emotional journey as an educator. He opens a discussion about the emotional realities of teaching by delving into a newfound discussion space. 

Here, Newkirk discusses how teachers can create this new space with students by giving them time, and how allowing time to listen invites the opportunity to discuss and solve problems more slowly in order to overcome roadblocks within their own work.

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PLC Series: The Language We Can Gather from Reading More Widely

Welcome to the Heinemann PD Professional Learning Community Series. This month we look closely at the creating opportunities for ourselves and our students to consider the power of the reading-writing connection.

“Read, read, read. Read everything—trash, classics, good and bad, and see how they do it. Just like a carpenter who works as an apprentice and studies the master. Read! You’ll absorb it. Then write. If it is good, you’ll find out.”

—William Faulkner

By Katherine Bomer

The secret to teaching how to write is to read, but that doesn't mean standing in front of the How to Write section in Barnes & Noble and picking a book by an author you’ve never heard of. Instead read what you’re passionate about and then try to widen the scope of that passion, reading different genres, so that you can say you’re passionate about good writing with the confidence that you know what good writing is regardless of genre. Trust in your own responses as a reader—good writing excites you, moves you, gives you clarity, makes you laugh, and makes you realize how deliciously complicated life really is.

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Supporting the Development of One-to-one Correspondence

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Adapted from Young Children's Mathematics: Cognitively Guided Instruction in Early Childhood Education 

by Thomas P. Carpenter, Megan L. Franke, Nicholas C. Johnson, Angela Chan Turrou, and Anita A. Wager


Supporting the Development of One-to-One Correspondence

Developing one-to-one correspondence occurs as children work to coordinate the counting of each object with one and only one number word. You can support the development of one-to-one correspondence by counting together with children, emphasizing matching the action of pointing, touching, or moving each object with the saying of a single number word. Or you might pose a question to the student such as, “How will you keep track of which ones you’ve counted and which ones you haven’t counted yet?” Some children benefit from putting the objects into a container as they count (such as during clean up), as it slows down their count and focuses them on one object at a time. Other children find that spreading out their collection or working with a partner is helpful. However, supporting children to use strategies to keep track of the objects counted will not immediately move children to use the one-to-one principle. Developing understanding of and the ability to use the one-to-one principle takes time and a range of experiences.

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The Best of the 2016 PLC Series

2016 was rich with content, conversation, and camaraderie in our Professional Learning Community blog series!  Thousands of educators like you pushed your thinking through reading, sharing, and discussing the videos, articles, book chapters, and more. No doubt students all over the country and even all over the world have received the benefits of your dedication to professional learning.

Let's take a look at some of the most popular posts of 2016!

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The Reading Strategies Book – Video Blogs

serravallo-vidblogwedThe Reading Strategies Book by Jennifer Serravallo will complement and extend your teaching. Rely on it to plan your lessons and implement goal-directed, differentiated instruction for individuals, small groups, and whole classes. If you're just starting with the book, or considering it, review these ten videos blogs from Jen to give you a sense of where to start: 

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Bring Math “Off the Page” with Movement

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Movement is much more than a technique for offering "brain breaks" to our students or sprinkling some hands-on learning into our instruction. In her new book, Math on the Move, author Malke Rosenfeld shows how pairing math concepts and whole body movement creates opportunities for students to make sense of math in entirely new ways.

In the clip below, Malke talks about the importance of bringing math "off the page." You'll also see a moving math class in action.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Want to learn more about Math on the Move? Click here to preview a sample chapter today.


rosenfeld_5165b Malke Rosenfeld is a dance teaching artist, author, and presenter whose interests focus on the learning that happens at the intersection of math and the moving body. She delights in creating rich environments in which children and adults can explore, make, play, and talk math based on their own questions and inclinations. Follow her on Twitter @mathinyourfeet.