Tag Archives: Smarter Charts for Math Science and Social Studies

How to (Re)Integrate Your Beliefs Into Your Curriculum

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This post was written by Kristi Mraz and originally published on the author's own blog, kinder confidential. Find more at kinderconfidential.wordpress.com


Now is the time of the year when the daydreams of August turn into the real work of teaching. What were your hopes and dreams before school started? Have they gotten buried under a heap of paperwork, assessments, and things not going the way you hoped? Let’s dust them off and bring them back! My co-author and all around favorite human, Christine Hertz, and I are working on a blog series about integrating your beliefs into your curriculum, with (hopefully) some handy tips along the way.

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Chart tips from the ChartChums: Part 2 Icons

In Smarter Charts and the brand new Smarter Charts for Math, Science, and Social Studies, Marjorie Martinelli(@MarjorieWrites) and Kristi Mraz(@MrazKristine) tell us you don’t even have to be able to draw to make great charts.

Even so, we could all use a pointer or two on how to make our charts look better. In these snippets from their forthcoming online course at the Heinemann Digital Campus, the ChartChums demonstrate a couple key drawing moves that can help any teacher who wants to make great charts. In part two we learn about the importance of drawing icons.

 

Smarter Charts for Math, Science, and Social Studies is out now. For more information and to download a sample chapter click here: Smarter Charts for Math, Science, and Social Studies sample. 

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Kristi Mraz and Marjorie Martinelli Show Us the Tools for Smarter Charts

The brand new Smarter Charts for Math, Science, and Social Studies is now available! In this cool new video (1:00), authors Kristi Mraz (@MrazKristine) and Marjorie Martinelli (@MarjorieWrites) demonstrate for us how it and its literacy predecessor Smarter Charts help us create tools that guide students to independence every day. Take a look (click here for a sample chapter)!

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Chart tips from the ChartChums: Part 1 Drawing People

In Smarter Charts and the brand new Smarter Charts for Math, Science, and Social Studies, Marjorie Martinelli and Kristi Mraz tell us you don’t even have to be able to draw to make great charts.

Even so, we could all use a pointer or two on how to make our charts look better. In these snippets from their forthcoming online course at the Heinemann Digital Campus, the ChartChums demonstrate a couple key drawing moves that can help any teacher who wants to make great charts. In part one we're learning how to draw people.

 

Smarter Charts for Math, Science, and Social Studies is out now. For more information and to download a sample chapter click here: Smarter Charts for Math, Science, and Social Studies sample.

Join the conversation on Twitter:


Smarter Charts for Math, Science, and Social Studies Cover Revealed

Heinemann publishing is thrilled to announce the cover for Smarter Charts for Math, Science, and Social Studies from authors Kristine Mraz and Marjorie Martinelli (also known as the Chartchums).

In the original Smarter Charts, Marjorie Martinelli and Kristi Mraz helped turn classroom literacy charts into teaching powerhouses. Now they show how to turn up the instructional energy on content-area charts, too. In Smarter Charts for Math, Science, and Social Studies, Marjorie and Kristi share how they learned to make truly effective content-area charts with students. This book helps turn complex ideas into kid-friendly visuals, helps children internalize content processes, and even increases instructional time.

With dozens of examples from the content areas, including full-color photographs, the Chartchums reveal step by step how to create charts that show Routines, Genres and Concepts, Processes, Repertoires of Strategies, and Exemplars. Then their “Charts in Action” sections they show how each type of chart builds engagement and improves independence as it gradually releases responsibility to learners. You don’t have to be a graphic designer or a subject-matter expert to benefit from this book.

Throughout the next few weeks, Heinemann will be sharing videos and Smarter Charts blogs from the authors on the Heinemann blog.

Click here to read a sample chapter

For more information on Smarter Charts for Math, Science, and Social Studies click here.

Join the Twitter conversation around #SmarterCharts