Tag Archives: Shared Reading

How to Set Up Reading Partnerships to Maximize Literacy Learning in Your Classroom

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Adapted from "What Are The Rest of my Kids Doing?" Fostering Independence in the K–2 Reading Workshop, by Lindsey Moses and Meridith Ogden


Partner reading is important for many reasons. Literacy is a socially constructed activity involving reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and visually representing. Reading together and talking about books can provide partners with enriching experiences, thinking, and conversation that would not take place while reading independently. In addition to the motivation, engagement, and social aspects, Rogoff (1990) documented interactions between partners that led to each child achieving a higher level of understanding than working by themselves. This could be due to the type of talk surrounding partner reading. Brown (2006) found five major themes of talk occurred during partner reading time in second grade: organizational, disputational, word strategy, meaning making, and personal talk. All of these, except personal talk, supported partner reading.

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Studying and Thinking about Powerful Whole Group Instruction: Minilessons, Shared Reading, & Read Aloud K-3

Calkins Read AloudStudying and Thinking about Powerful Whole Group Instruction: Minilessons, Shared Reading, & Read Aloud K-3

See below for a full transcript of the chat

Written by Anna Gratz Cockerille

One power of reading workshop is the way in which instruction can move seamlessly from whole-group, to small-group, to individual and back again in the span of a class period. Certainly, a reading teacher’s best chance of really moving kids further in their understanding is while working with small groups and individuals, where instruction can be differentiated to meet the needs of the each student. It is not as possible to meet every student’s needs during whole-group instruction. Inevitably, there will be students who are beyond or not quite at the level of whole-group lessons. But these lessons serve a very important purpose, nonetheless. They serve to rally students’ energy around a single, worthy cause. They serve to create classroom community-wide goals for reading and common language to talk about these goals. They serve to get students jazzed up about a new line of thinking, or a new trajectory in their path of work. 

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TCRWP Twitter Chat: Planning and Implementing Powerful Shared Reading K–2

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See below for the full #TCRWP chat transcript.

by Anna Gratz Cockerille

Hooray! It’s shared reading time! Shared reading is often one of the most celebrated—and celebratory—times in the school day. In Chapter 12 of A Guide to the Reading Workshop, Primary Grades, Lucy Calkins writes, “To imagine shared reading, think of the times when you’ve attended the concert of a favorite singer. The star performer picks up the mic and takes the lead in a hit song. The audience sings along, and whenever the performer pauses in the song, the crowd fills in the lyrics. The crowd’s engagement is high, and their voices come together to almost overpower the lead singer” (p. 135).

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