Tag Archives: Moving Writers

Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for August 21–27

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These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for April 17–23

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Time for another Link Round-Up!

These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for April 3–9

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What a week! Have you been celebrating National Poetry Month? You should be. Here's a poem right now. Time for another Link Round-Up!

These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of October 4–10

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It's another week and another round of education links! That's a nice picture above, isn't it? I took it.

These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Larry Ferlazzo posted the first in a series about grit. Authors Kristi Mraz and Christine Hertz were featured. Here's a sample of their response:

If grit is an ability to sustain interest and effort in something for a long period, we also need to teach a system of checks and balances for children to ensure that the thing they pursue is worthwhile and healthy- not only to them, but also to the world at large. Grit, in and of itself, can result in positive or negative outcomes. Sustaining interest and effort in a long term criminal enterprise demonstrates grit, but not many people would say that is a good thing. We, as teachers, should not just teach grit, but also the equally important traits of empathy, optimism, flexibility, and a practice of reflection to decide if the path we are on at given point is good for us, and good for the world.

Click through to read the entire post

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Frank Serafini (Reading Workshop 2.0) wrote about picture books in the digital age:

Readers of digital picturebooks must work through the presentation of a fictional narrative using physical, cognitive, visual, emotional, and embodied capabilities, among others. As picturebook narratives in digital formats evolve and become part of the reading curriculum in more classrooms, picturebook scholars, literacy educators, and classroom teachers will need new lenses or frameworks for analyzing these texts and developing pedagogical approaches that support classroom instruction and readers’ transactions across digital and print-based platforms. In this article, we will consider the features and designs of picturebook apps and some challenges and possibilities these digital texts offer elementary grade teachers and students.

Click through to read his full post

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At Moving Writers, Rebekah O'Dell quit grading. She explains:

I quit grading individual assignments — classwork, participation, annotated Poems of the Week, even papers. I make notes in the gradebook and leave copious feedback on each assignment. But, I don’t assign a grade value to their work. Students are encouraged to use the feedback to revise any work they would like to revise — it’s about getting it right, getting it better, not about getting a higher grade.

Read the full post

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"It's time to take a hard look at how we teach reading," says Nancie Atwell for The Telegraph:

Methods matter. So do the findings of literacy research. We have almost a quarter century of studies that document how literacy blooms wherever students have access to books they want to read, permission to choose their own, and time to get lost in them. Enticing collections of literature—interesting books written at levels they can decode with accuracy and comprehend with ease—are key to children becoming skilled, thoughtful, avid readers.

Click through to read Nancie's full editorial

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That's it! Be sure to check back next week for another round of links. If you have a link or a blog, be sure to mention them in the comments below. You can also email them to us or tweet at us. We're pretty available over here. Cheers to your weekend!

*Photo by Cameron

Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of July 5–11

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We took a break from the Link Round-Up last week to celebrate Independence Day, but we're back now! 

Each week we find around five interesting reads for you to take into the weekend. These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Oyster River Middle School student Emmy Goyette has received a National Honor Award in the 2015 Letters About Literature competition, one of three recipients in the seventh- and eighth-grade category nationwide.

“Of all the wonderful and heartfelt letters we judged, I found myself coming back again and again to Emmy Goyette's letter to Laurie Halse Anderson,” noted New Hampshire author Paul Durham, who served as one of the state judges. “Emmy's words lingered with me well after I'd read them. They were raw and haunting, but possessed a simple beauty and clarity at the same time.”

Click through to read more.

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BuzzFeed News's Azmat Khan wrote about the state of schools in Afghanistan:

This year, BuzzFeed News found that the overwhelming majority of the more than 50 U.S.-funded schools it visited resemble abandoned buildings — marred by collapsing roofs, shattered glass, boarded-up windows, protruding electrical wires, decaying doors, or other structural defects. At least a quarter of the schools BuzzFeed News visited do not have running water.

Click through to read the full investigation.

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Julieanne Harmatz of "To Read To Write To Be" answered, "Are you a writer?"

No, I’m a teacher. I teach writing, so I’m learning about ways to teach writing. But, me, oh nooo. I don’t write. That’s how I described myself to the man who sat next to me on the flight to New York. I was too embarrassed to say, yes I write.

Click through to read the full blog post.

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At "It's All About Kids and Literacy," treat yourself to a summer of writing:

Again, I was reminded what it might feel like for my kids while they write, intimidating. The one thing that is staying with me from this wonderful experience is that writing is best if it belongs to the owner of the writing, the one doing the writing.

Click through to read the full post.

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At "Moving Writers," Allison Marchetti wrote about mentor sentences to help students write better analysis:

Like Rebekah, I, too, am searching for ways to make literary analysis a richer experience for my young writers. While my students are working on a fairly traditional literary analysis of a poem right now, I have been able to complicate the simplistic formula they have been trained to use for far too long (5 paragraphs, claim as last sentence in introduction, sentences that start with the phrase “This quote shows that…” and so forth ) by sharing ways that professional writers have written about themes, symbols, and diction.

Click through to read the full post.

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That's it! Be sure to check back next week for another round of links. If you have a link or a blog, be sure to mention them in the comments below. Cheers to your weekend!

*Photo by Daniela Cuevas