Tag Archives: Frank Serafini

The Big 5: Lindsey Moses on the Books That Most Influenced Her Teaching Practice

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Every so often we like to ask our authors about the books that most affected their teaching, the books that served as turning points in their practice or opened their eyes to a new way of approaching their work, thinking about education, or seeing children. In this installment, we bring you the professional book top five of Lindsey Moses, assistant professor of literacy education at Arizona State University, and former elementary teacher. Lindsey is the author of several Heinemann books. Her most recent book, "What are the Rest of my Kids Doing?" Fostering Independence in the K-2 Reading Workshop is now available, and can be ordered hereContinue reading

Teacher Appreciation: Frank Serafini On An Education Professor

Frank Serafini remembers his first education professor from college, who introduced him to the Heinemann family of authors and books.

 

Frank Serafini is the author of Reading Workshop 2.0, released in 2015. 

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It's Teacher Appreciation Week! We thank you today and everyday. Click here to learn about our special Teacher Appreciation Week coupon code!

Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of October 4–10

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It's another week and another round of education links! That's a nice picture above, isn't it? I took it.

These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Larry Ferlazzo posted the first in a series about grit. Authors Kristi Mraz and Christine Hertz were featured. Here's a sample of their response:

If grit is an ability to sustain interest and effort in something for a long period, we also need to teach a system of checks and balances for children to ensure that the thing they pursue is worthwhile and healthy- not only to them, but also to the world at large. Grit, in and of itself, can result in positive or negative outcomes. Sustaining interest and effort in a long term criminal enterprise demonstrates grit, but not many people would say that is a good thing. We, as teachers, should not just teach grit, but also the equally important traits of empathy, optimism, flexibility, and a practice of reflection to decide if the path we are on at given point is good for us, and good for the world.

Click through to read the entire post

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Frank Serafini (Reading Workshop 2.0) wrote about picture books in the digital age:

Readers of digital picturebooks must work through the presentation of a fictional narrative using physical, cognitive, visual, emotional, and embodied capabilities, among others. As picturebook narratives in digital formats evolve and become part of the reading curriculum in more classrooms, picturebook scholars, literacy educators, and classroom teachers will need new lenses or frameworks for analyzing these texts and developing pedagogical approaches that support classroom instruction and readers’ transactions across digital and print-based platforms. In this article, we will consider the features and designs of picturebook apps and some challenges and possibilities these digital texts offer elementary grade teachers and students.

Click through to read his full post

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At Moving Writers, Rebekah O'Dell quit grading. She explains:

I quit grading individual assignments — classwork, participation, annotated Poems of the Week, even papers. I make notes in the gradebook and leave copious feedback on each assignment. But, I don’t assign a grade value to their work. Students are encouraged to use the feedback to revise any work they would like to revise — it’s about getting it right, getting it better, not about getting a higher grade.

Read the full post

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"It's time to take a hard look at how we teach reading," says Nancie Atwell for The Telegraph:

Methods matter. So do the findings of literacy research. We have almost a quarter century of studies that document how literacy blooms wherever students have access to books they want to read, permission to choose their own, and time to get lost in them. Enticing collections of literature—interesting books written at levels they can decode with accuracy and comprehend with ease—are key to children becoming skilled, thoughtful, avid readers.

Click through to read Nancie's full editorial

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That's it! Be sure to check back next week for another round of links. If you have a link or a blog, be sure to mention them in the comments below. You can also email them to us or tweet at us. We're pretty available over here. Cheers to your weekend!

*Photo by Cameron

Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of August 2–8

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Welcome to this week's link round-up. August is here now, and the sun sets earlier than it did yesterday. Retail footwear outlets have sent out their direct mailers, advertising back-to-school discounts. The slow braking of the summer began last weekend, and we won't know its full-stop until one of you eats the last spoonful of potato salad at a Labor Day cookout. Here are some links!

Each week we find around five interesting reads for you to take into the weekend. These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Author Frank Serafini wrote about building a classroom library over on his blog:

Of course, there are some books that I keep “hidden away” for surprises during the year, but for the most part all of my books are available to my students from the beginning of the school year. I do keep some extremely valuable books and some autographed copies of certain titles on a special shelf near my desk, but these are also available for students to read. They simply have to ask. I want students to feel free to select any books in the classroom, while at the same time teaching them to assume responsibility for caring for the classroom book collection.

Click through to read the full post.

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At Eduedo Magazine, Dave Madden reviewed The Unstoppable Writing Teacher by Colleen Cruz:

As an elementary teacher, I wonder how often others expect us to be obnoxiously happy, running around with smiles plastered to our faces and constantly expressing: how cutes and how sweets. Teachers would rally in agreement: not all teachers are like that. We may not all be cut from the same cloth, but I definitely sense a “stink-eye” from others if my plastered smile evolves into a more serious tone. I was jealous of all those who shared a workspace with Cruz because I closely related to her pessimistic vantage; I imagined collaborative meetings improving exponentially with another like-minded person to dispense that other view.

Click through to read the full review.

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At the Facing Today blog for Facing History, Doc Miller discussed eight components of a reflective classroom:

In a reflective classroom community, students work together in an engaging study of our past, and of our world today. Knowledge is constructed, not passively absorbed. And students, with both hearts and minds mobilized, are seen as subjects actively engaged in a community of learners. A trusting classroom atmosphere like this creates the space for deep, democratic learning.

Click through to read the full article.

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Teacher Learning Sessions is a newly launched podcast network featuring authors Penny Kittle and Jennifer Serravallo. You can listen to the first episode of "Stories from the Teaching Life with Penny Kittle" right here.

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That's it! Be sure to check back next week for another round of links. If you have a link or a blog, be sure to mention them in the comments below. You can also email them to us or tweet at us. We're pretty available over here. Cheers to your weekend!

*Photo by Gilly Stewart.

Announcing Heinemann’s Third Annual Teacher Tour

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Heinemann Publishing is thrilled to announce the date for our third annual Teacher Tour. Each year we open our doors to educators and invite you to spend a Saturday with us and a selection of our authors for a day of learning and special giveaways.

Heinemann’s Third Annual Teacher Tour
Where: Heinemann, 361 Hanover St, Portsmouth, NH 03801
When: August 1st, 2015 from 8:00am to 12:30pm

​You’re invited to Heinemann’s offices in downtown Portsmouth to see what goes on behind the scenes, meet our editors and staff, and participate in four 40-minute sessions with several of our well-known authors, including:


Frank Serafini, author of Reading Workshop 2.0


Lindsey Moses, author of Supporting English Learners in the Reading Workshop


Sara Ahmed, coauthor with Smokey Daniels of Upstanders


Colleen Cruz, author of The Unstoppable Writing Teacher

All participants will receive complimentary professional development resources! Don't miss this great opportunity to learn about Heinemann and share your insights with us about how we can meet your classroom needs. Please note there is no cost to attend this event, but space is limited, so register now.

Register here and mark your calendar!

See a sample of last year's Teacher Tour here:

Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of June 7–13

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Welcome to the newest installment in our weekly link series on the Heinemann blog! Each week we find around five interesting links for you to take into the weekend. These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Heinemann authors Frank Serafini, Kristin Ziemke, and Katie Muhtaris are featured in Larry Ferlazzo's "Classroom Q&A" series on EdWeek. The question: "How can we teachers use digital portfolios to help students show what they know and show us how they've used what they learned?"

If we want students to value the process of reflecting on learning and applying that learning then we must make space for it in our classroom. We need to set aside time to model and practice the process, engage in long term reflection, follow-up on goals, and ultimately, celebrate! Students should feel the joy of accomplishment and have that joy honored by their community. In this way, all students are empowered to accept that they can become the learner they want to be.
—Katie Muhtaris and Kristin Ziemke

​Click through to read all the responses.

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Max Ray asks, "Anyone want to do some research on problem solving?"

There seem to be several conversations among math teacher bloggers and Tweeters about if and how they use “non-routine problems,” the role of asking vs. telling, whether it’s okay to give students hints or not, that often come down to a belief that sounds sort of like this: The best teachers say the least.

Click through to read Max's blog post.

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Author Lisa Eickholdt talked about unlikely mentors at Two Writing Teachers.

One of my favorite things is to watch a student’s reaction when I ask if I can use their writing in a lesson. The kid immediately sits up straighter, smiles, and generally looks more confident. I think every child deserves to experience this. To feel like they are good at something, so good they have been asked to mentor others. And I want every teacher to have the pleasure of watching their kids have that amazing reaction.

Click through to read the full interview.

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Heinemann author Jocelyn Chadwick is the next NCTE Vice President.

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At Leading Great Learning, Mike Anderson wrote about "Personalized Learning through Student-Led Research" and offered tips to help students with a research project.

Help Students Choose: Make sure to help students find topics that are personally relevant, within their cognitive reach, and that fit within the scope of the theme or standards you’re teaching. Consider having students choose three possible topics and then coach them to the best fit of the three.

Click through to read all the tips.

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That's it! Be sure to check back next week for another round of links. If you have a link or a blog, be sure to mention them in the comments below. Cheers to your weekend!