Tag Archives: ELA

The Real Challenge of the Teaching Journey

making-the-journey_sm_mg5d3541 


Our time in the classroom can be transformative in profound ways. For some, this issue becomes more than dealing with content and students in an ethical way. It expands into a broader realm, that of social justice, as described by Sonia Nieto:

Teachers enter the profession for any number of reasons, but neither fame nor money nor the promise of lavish working conditions is at the top of that list. Instead . . . for many of them, social justice figures prominently among the motivating factors underlying their choice to teach. The urge to live a life of service that entails a commitment to the ideals of democracy, fair play, and equality is strong among many of those who begin teaching. (2003, 91)

Nieto continues, though, to remind us that “teachers are not miracle workers. Nor are they social workers or missionaries.” Instead, “teachers need to understand their roles as involving more than simply attending to the minds of students; it also entails nurturing their hearts and souls . . . to do this without taking on the world of injustice is tricky business . . . an equilibrium that is difficult at best” (105).

Continue reading

Heinemann Fellow Tricia Ebarvia: All I Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten

Fellows_EmbroideredLog


In 2009, I interviewed for the PA Writing and Literature Project (PAWLP) Summer Institute. During the interview, Deb Dinsmore, one of the institute facilitators, asked me something that I have never forgotten:

“How do you teach reading?”

Continue reading

What’s New in Making the Journey, Fourth Edition?

making-the-journey_sm_mg5d3541

By Leila Christenbury

In our society we thrive on the reimagined, the reconceived, the improved, the better than ever. The ancient proverb may insist that there is nothing new under the sun, but that has never seemed to convince most of us Americans. If it’s new, most of us are in—or are at least pretty interested.

Continue reading

The Journey Toward Making the Journey, fourth edition

making-the-journey_sm_mg5d3435

By Ken Lindblom​

Leila Christenbury and I recently published the fourth edition of her well-known guide for the field’s newest teachers of English. Leila wrote the first three editions on her own. So how did I get so lucky to be Leila’s co-author for this edition?

Continue reading

PIE: The Essential and Collaborative Parts of Engagement with Our Students – Part 4

teachingliterature_twitterchat_1080x1080-jpg

As part of an upcoming Twitter chat on Thursday – September 29 at 8pm (eastern), Heinemann authors Jocelyn A. Chadwick and John E. Grassie are writing a four-part blog series on the core elements of ELA instruction. They write “because our students are ever-changing, we, too, must rethink and re-imagine what we teach, how we teach, why we teach literature, as well as literature's essential place and role in achieving lifelong literacy.” We must “rethink and re-imagine what we teach, how we teach, why we teach literature, as well as literature's essential place and role in achieving lifelong literacy.” 


In Teaching Literature In The Context Of Literacy Instruction, coauthors Chadwick and Grassie explore how the familiar literature we love can be taught in a way that not only engages students but does so within the context of literacy instruction, reflecting the needs of today’s classrooms. In part one of our blog series, the authors suggest how making pie connects to the work being done today by ELA specialists. 

Continue reading

PIE: The Essential and Collaborative Parts of Engagement with Our Students – Part 3

teachingliterature_twitterchat_1080x1080-jpg

As part of an upcoming Twitter chat on Thursday – September 29 at 8pm (eastern), Heinemann authors Jocelyn A. Chadwick and John E. Grassie are writing a four-part blog series on the core elements of ELA instruction. They write “because our students are ever-changing, we, too, must rethink and re-imagine what we teach, how we teach, why we teach literature, as well as literature's essential place and role in achieving lifelong literacy.” We must “rethink and re-imagine what we teach, how we teach, why we teach literature, as well as literature's essential place and role in achieving lifelong literacy.” 


In Teaching Literature In The Context Of Literacy Instruction, coauthors Chadwick and Grassie explore how the familiar literature we love can be taught in a way that not only engages students but does so within the context of literacy instruction, reflecting the needs of today’s classrooms. In part one of our blog series, the authors suggest how making pie connects to the work being done today by ELA specialists. 

Continue reading