Tag Archives: EdWeek

Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for May 29–June 4

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Time for another link round-up! Put on your glasses, grab a cup of coffee, and let life's eternal mysteries provide the soundtrack to your reading. These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of December 6–12

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Another week has passed and 2015 is almost over. Do you have any resolutions yet for the next year? Perhaps to round up more links than usual? That's fair.

These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of October 18–24

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Time for a link round-up! Stop whatever it is that you're doing and click these links. What are you doing? Another circle time? Are you interrupting a moment of authentic engagement to comment on how engaged everyone is? Stop that. Let it unfold. Click these links instead.

These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of June 7–13

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Welcome to the newest installment in our weekly link series on the Heinemann blog! Each week we find around five interesting links for you to take into the weekend. These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Heinemann authors Frank Serafini, Kristin Ziemke, and Katie Muhtaris are featured in Larry Ferlazzo's "Classroom Q&A" series on EdWeek. The question: "How can we teachers use digital portfolios to help students show what they know and show us how they've used what they learned?"

If we want students to value the process of reflecting on learning and applying that learning then we must make space for it in our classroom. We need to set aside time to model and practice the process, engage in long term reflection, follow-up on goals, and ultimately, celebrate! Students should feel the joy of accomplishment and have that joy honored by their community. In this way, all students are empowered to accept that they can become the learner they want to be.
—Katie Muhtaris and Kristin Ziemke

​Click through to read all the responses.

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Max Ray asks, "Anyone want to do some research on problem solving?"

There seem to be several conversations among math teacher bloggers and Tweeters about if and how they use “non-routine problems,” the role of asking vs. telling, whether it’s okay to give students hints or not, that often come down to a belief that sounds sort of like this: The best teachers say the least.

Click through to read Max's blog post.

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Author Lisa Eickholdt talked about unlikely mentors at Two Writing Teachers.

One of my favorite things is to watch a student’s reaction when I ask if I can use their writing in a lesson. The kid immediately sits up straighter, smiles, and generally looks more confident. I think every child deserves to experience this. To feel like they are good at something, so good they have been asked to mentor others. And I want every teacher to have the pleasure of watching their kids have that amazing reaction.

Click through to read the full interview.

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Heinemann author Jocelyn Chadwick is the next NCTE Vice President.

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At Leading Great Learning, Mike Anderson wrote about "Personalized Learning through Student-Led Research" and offered tips to help students with a research project.

Help Students Choose: Make sure to help students find topics that are personally relevant, within their cognitive reach, and that fit within the scope of the theme or standards you’re teaching. Consider having students choose three possible topics and then coach them to the best fit of the three.

Click through to read all the tips.

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That's it! Be sure to check back next week for another round of links. If you have a link or a blog, be sure to mention them in the comments below. Cheers to your weekend!

Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of May 4–8

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Welcome to the next issue in a new series on the Heinemann blog! Every week we find around five interesting links for you to take into your much deserved weekend. These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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In Larry Ferlazzo's EdWeek blog, Heinemann author ReLeah Lent responded to the question, "What are 'Small Learning Communities' (dividing large campuses into special interest small schools) and how do they work?"

Strong support networks and personalized attention are generally hallmarks of any smaller community, components of learning that are especially important if there is little support at home. Students often develop lasting relationships not only with other students, but with teachers and community partners. In one school, for example, the local bar association created a law library at the school and offered internships during the summer for students in the law academy. If project-based, interdisciplinary learning is a component of study, as it often is, students have increased opportunities to apply what they've learned and prepare for college and career in authentic ways.

Click through to read Classroom Q&A with Larry Ferlazzo: "Response: The Value of 'Small Learning Communities.'"

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Author Donalyn Miller wrote about summer reading as its own reward and the 7th Annual #Bookaday Challenge:

Summer liberates my reading and writing life, too. I indulge in reading and writing binges instead of snatching time in between other things. I dream of languid days curled up under my ceiling fan—reading and writing for as long as I wish. Delicious as eating peaches over the sink.

Click through to read more from "Reading Is Its Own Reward: Summer Reading and the 7th Annual #Bookaday Challenge."

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On Dr. Gravity Goldberg's blog, Laura Harder, a 4th grade teacher, wrote about self-reflection and how it empowers her students:

Teachers’ feedback is certainly valuable and informative, however, listening to the student’s talk about their own progress while reading through their opinion pieces from the beginning of the year, gave them a sense of empowerment that ultimately needed to come from within themselves.

Click through to read "Self Reflection: A Tool For Empowering Students."

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On LitLearnAct, author Dana Johansen discussed how to use QR Codes in the Writing Workshop:

About three years ago, I began using a blended learning approach to teaching writing and reading workshop with QR codes and mobile devices such as iPads and smart phones. Over the years I have found that using QR codes and my class website has helped connect my students to our discussions and coursework through their mobile devices and computers.

Click through to read "QR Codes in Writing Workshop (Part 1)"

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Check back next week for more interesting links. Do you write a blog about your experiences in education? Leave a link in the comments below and we'll consider it for future round-ups. Have a great weekend!

Nancie Atwell Shares Thoughts On Current Educational Landscape

In the following statement supplied to EdWeek, Nancie Atwell clarifies recent comments regarding whether she would recommend teaching as a path for young people.

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Teaching has been my pride and pleasure for more than four decades. I encourage anyone anywhere who enjoys working with young people to consider it as a career. The world needs all the smart, passionate educators it can get.

However, every day in classrooms around the globe, teachers face an array of challenges. In U.S. public schools, these include a tight focus on standardized tests and methods, which I feel discourage autonomy and encourage teaching to the test. I cheer for the veteran teachers who find wiggle room, administrative support, or both, and continue to act as reflective practitioners. I also applaud the decision-makers who respect teachers as professionals—who acknowledge our knowledge of our craft and our kids. And I empathize with aspiring teachers. I strongly believe they need to be aware of and prepared for the particular challenges of the current climate.

I have loved my teaching life, whether I was closing the door to my public school classroom and innovating without permission, or founding a non-profit demonstration school, the Center for Teaching and Learning, where innovation for the good of all children everywhere is our mission. It is a privilege to develop relationships with students, develop methods that transform their lives, and be of use to them in this robust yet nurturing way. Winning the Global Teacher Prize has given me an opportunity to not only shine a light on teaching as a powerful profession but also start a conversation about the challenges we face today. I believe that teachers are the people who know what's best for our students and right for our classrooms.

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Click here for Heinemann's additional coverage of the Global Teacher Prize.