Tag Archives: Digital Learning

Amplify: 3 Ways Of Digital Teaching To Try Tomorrow

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Amplify: Digital Teaching and Learning in the K–6 Classroom by Kristin Ziemke and Katie Muhtaris is out now. Amplify does exactly what the title implies. "When introducing technological tools, we often apply the same practices and strategies we use in our daily teaching, but amplify their power with technology,” write coauthors Katie Muhtaris and Kristin Ziemke. “We model what we want students to do with the technology, guide them to try it out with us, provide time for practice, then share as a class.”

In today's post, the authors list three ways to incorporate digital teaching into your everyday practice. Try them out!

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Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of July 19–25

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Welcome to this week's link round-up. How are you? We're back from ILA and ready to share some hot links.

Each week we find around five interesting reads for you to take into the weekend. These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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ILA is accepting submissions for its 2016 conference in Boston. Click here to sign up, sign in, and propose!

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We liveblogged from ILA on Saturday and Sunday. Check out Saturday's updates here and Sunday's updates here.

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Katie Muhtaris, coauthor of the forthcoming Amplify: Digital Teaching and Learning in the K-5 Classroom, wrote about the top tools for students in her classroom.

We are huge advocates for choosing the right tools and using them well with our students.  You don’t need pages and pages of apps and websites to use with kids.  You really only need a few good core ones that you can use all the time across the day.  Of course everyone always wants to know what our top tools are.

Click here to read "The Top 8" at Innovate, Ignite, Inspire.

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Heinemann Fellow Jess Lifshitz wrote in defense of fun reading:

And then I started teaching fifth grade. And this is when I began to forget what I knew. This is when I began to only choose books to read aloud that were serious and led to what I considered to be “deep thinking.” This is when I stopped looking for books that made me laugh and that would make my students laugh. This is when my classroom library began to feel so unbalanced with shelves full of bins of realistic fiction books while my graphic novel bins sat empty. This is when I began to think that books that made you cry had more worth and more value than books that made you laugh. This is when I began to think that preparing my students for junior high was more important than preparing my students for a life full of reading.

Click through to read "In Defense of Reading That Is Fun."

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Put your estimation skills and number sense to work with this challenge from NPR.

“We're running an experiment. We're going to use the results in a podcast in a few weeks. The rules are simple: Guess how much this cow weighs.”

For more resources on using estimation challenges to promote numeracy and problem solving in your classroom, check out Andrew Stadel’s Estimation 180 website.

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That's it! Be sure to check back next week for another round of links. If you have a link or a blog, be sure to mention them in the comments below. Cheers to your weekend!

*Photo by Iswanto Arif

Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of June 7–13

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Welcome to the newest installment in our weekly link series on the Heinemann blog! Each week we find around five interesting links for you to take into the weekend. These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Heinemann authors Frank Serafini, Kristin Ziemke, and Katie Muhtaris are featured in Larry Ferlazzo's "Classroom Q&A" series on EdWeek. The question: "How can we teachers use digital portfolios to help students show what they know and show us how they've used what they learned?"

If we want students to value the process of reflecting on learning and applying that learning then we must make space for it in our classroom. We need to set aside time to model and practice the process, engage in long term reflection, follow-up on goals, and ultimately, celebrate! Students should feel the joy of accomplishment and have that joy honored by their community. In this way, all students are empowered to accept that they can become the learner they want to be.
—Katie Muhtaris and Kristin Ziemke

​Click through to read all the responses.

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Max Ray asks, "Anyone want to do some research on problem solving?"

There seem to be several conversations among math teacher bloggers and Tweeters about if and how they use “non-routine problems,” the role of asking vs. telling, whether it’s okay to give students hints or not, that often come down to a belief that sounds sort of like this: The best teachers say the least.

Click through to read Max's blog post.

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Author Lisa Eickholdt talked about unlikely mentors at Two Writing Teachers.

One of my favorite things is to watch a student’s reaction when I ask if I can use their writing in a lesson. The kid immediately sits up straighter, smiles, and generally looks more confident. I think every child deserves to experience this. To feel like they are good at something, so good they have been asked to mentor others. And I want every teacher to have the pleasure of watching their kids have that amazing reaction.

Click through to read the full interview.

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Heinemann author Jocelyn Chadwick is the next NCTE Vice President.

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At Leading Great Learning, Mike Anderson wrote about "Personalized Learning through Student-Led Research" and offered tips to help students with a research project.

Help Students Choose: Make sure to help students find topics that are personally relevant, within their cognitive reach, and that fit within the scope of the theme or standards you’re teaching. Consider having students choose three possible topics and then coach them to the best fit of the three.

Click through to read all the tips.

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That's it! Be sure to check back next week for another round of links. If you have a link or a blog, be sure to mention them in the comments below. Cheers to your weekend!