Tag Archives: Common Core State Standards

In Math, Context is Critical

Fosnot_Header

Today's math teachers have a lot to balance. From following the Standards for Mathematical Practice, to incorporating real-life application into math problems, to finding resources that are flexible enough to meet a range of students' needs. 

Cathy Fosnot's Contexts for Learning Mathematics is a rigorous K-6 classroom resource that uses a workshop environment to bring the Standards for Mathematical Practice to life. Rich, authentic contexts provide a backdrop for fostering the use of mathematical models as thinking tools, tenacious problem solving, and the reading and writing of mathematical arguments and justifications to ensure the development of a positive growth mindset.

Continue reading

How the Standards for Mathematical Practice Support Teachers

Cover_MaxRay

How can we break the cycle of frustrated students who “drop out of math” because the procedures just don’t make sense to them? Or who memorize the procedures for the test but don’t really understand the mathematics? Max Ray and his colleagues at the Math Forum @ Drexel University say “problem solved,” by offering their collective wisdom about how students become proficient problem solvers, through the lens of the CCSS for Mathematical Practices. They unpack the process of problem solving in fresh new ways and turn the Practices into activities that teachers can use to foster habits of mind required by the Common Core.

Continue reading

The Role of Community in Math

Fosnot_Header

Today's math teachers have a lot to balance. From following the Standards for Mathematical Practice, to incorporating real-life application into math problems, to finding resources that are flexible enough to meet a range of students' needs. 

Cathy Fosnot's Contexts for Learning Mathematics is a rigorous K-6 classroom resource that uses a workshop environment to bring the Standards for Mathematical Practice to life. Rich, authentic contexts provide a backdrop for fostering the use of mathematical models as thinking tools, tenacious problem solving, and the reading and writing of mathematical arguments and justifications to ensure the development of a positive growth mindset.

Continue reading

Giving Feedback to Students

Cover_MaxRay


How can we break the cycle of frustrated students who “drop out of math” because the procedures just don’t make sense to them? Or who memorize the procedures for the test but don’t really understand the mathematics? Max Ray-Riek and his colleagues at the Math Forum at Drexel University say “problem solved,” by offering their collective wisdom about how students become proficient problem solvers, through the lens of the CCSS for Mathematical Practices. They unpack the process of problem solving in fresh new ways and turn the Practices into activities that teachers can use to foster habits of mind required by the Common Core.

Continue reading

Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of June 21–27

2014-09-08 19.12.49

We have a handful of great links for your last weekend in June! Each week we find around five interesting reads for you to take into the weekend. These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

⇔ ⇔ ⇔

Author Jo Boaler wrote an Op-Ed for The Hechinger Report:

Brain science tells us that the students who are better memorizers do not have more math “ability” or potential but we continue to value the faster memorizers over those who think slowly, deeply and creatively – the students we need for our scientific and technological future. The past decade has produced a generation of students who are procedurally competent but cannot think their way out of a box. This is a problem.

Click through to read all of "Memorizers are the lowest achievers and other Common Core math surprises."

⇔ ⇔ ⇔

On the Teaching Channel blog, teacher and math specialist Kristin Gray (@MathMinds) reflects on the difference between solving problems to learn math and learning math to solve problems. She asks, “How often do we give teachers ideas they must implement in their classroom and tools to do so, without offering the opportunity to think about how these tools work for them?”

Click through to read "Powerful Problem-Solving… For Teachers and Students."

⇔ ⇔ ⇔

Melanie Meehan at Two Reflective Teachers wrote about balanced assessment for Tuesday's Slice of Life:

How do we get around the fact that assessments create GPAs, and in competitive high schools, GPAs are important components of college applications? Do we count formative assessments into GPAs? Within our conference room of teacher leaders, we did not have consensus. Some teachers do count formative assessment, while others use it only to provide information to students about how they are doing. If they don't average formative assessment into reported grades, should students who reach targets more quickly receive higher grades?

Click through to read "Thinking About Balanced Assessment."

⇔ ⇔ ⇔

And Jennifer Ward wrote a post called "Getting Testy About Testing":

As Afflerbach states, the negative consequences of such high-stakes assessments far outweigh the positives. Students broke down and cried during our six days of state assessments. Students began school with two hours of state tests and then went through their regular classes. A full day of classes following a grueling two hours of high stakes tests upon which their graduation is dependent.

Click through to read the full piece.

⇔ ⇔ ⇔

⇔ ⇔ ⇔

That's it! Be sure to check back next week for another round of links. If you have a link or a blog, be sure to mention them in the comments below. Cheers to your weekend!

Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of May 10–16

imagineitbetter

Welcome to the newest installment in our weekly link series on the Heinemann blog! Every week we find around five interesting links for you to take into your much deserved weekend. These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

⇔⇔⇔

Author Vicki Vinton advocated for an alternate route in determining text complexity for standardized assessments:

The Common Core seems to have ushered in an age where third grade has become the new middle school, middle school is the new high school, and high school is the new college. And that’s all because of the particular vision the Common Core authors have about what it means to be college and career ready.

Click through to read "Toward a Saner View of Text Complexity" on To Make a Prairie

⇔⇔⇔

Kylene Beers revealed the results to a survey she conducted that asked 1,000 teachers, "What reading skills do you most often teach to skilled readers" and, "What reading skills to you most often teach to less skilled readers?"

If kids never have the chance to question the text, then they never learn to question the text. If their teacher doesn’t give them time to learn to question the author or make inferences, they don’t learn to do those things. More worrisome, they perhaps begin to assume that they should not question the text, not question the author, not look for biases, not make inferences.

Click through to read "Who is Taught What?" on Kylene Beers's blog

⇔⇔⇔

Marjorie Martinelli and Kristi Mraz—known in professional circles as The Chartchums—have joined with us to offer online workshops: Chartchums Live! (or as close as we can get).

We planned the course with the hope that it would help teachers deepen children’s engagement with charts by teaching how charts can build independence and agency, communicate information efficiently and effectively, and help in setting and achieving goals.

Click through to learn more from the Chartchums

⇔⇔⇔

On Bright, in the Medium publishing platform, Soraya Shockley of Youth Radio discussed education technology from a student's point of view:

A Teenager’s View on Education Technology

⇔⇔⇔

Patricia Vitale-Reilly, author of Engaging Every Learner, was interviewed on Four O'Clock Faculty:

Check back next week for more interesting links. Do you write a blog about your experiences in education? Leave a link in the comments below and we'll consider it for future round-ups. Have a great weekend!