Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for June 5–11

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The first full week of June is past! You are so close to the end of this school year! Time for another link round-up. Settle in.

These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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Newest Heinemann Fellows Chris Hall and Ian Fleischer were featured in the Foster's Daily Democrat last week:

Fleischer and Hall will serve as fellows for the Heinemann Fellowship Class of 2016-2018. Every two years, Heinemann awards 10 or so educators from across the country a fellowship to conduct individual research on challenges schools and teachers face. The 11 candidates will work alongside one another at meetings throughout the two-year fellowship to enhance and support teaching practices and educational communities. They will conduct independent studies, while staying at their respective teaching jobs. They will meet periodically with others in the fellowship and publish educational articles on Heinemann's digital campus.

Click through to read the full article

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At Edutopia, Nell Duke wrote about literacy practices we should abandon:

You've all seen it — students who got the words right on Friday misspell those same words in their writing the following Monday! Research suggests that the whole-class weekly spelling test is much less effective than an approach in which different students have different sets of words depending on their stage of spelling development, and emphasis is placed on analyzing and using the words rather than taking a test on them (see Palmer & Invernizzi, 2015 for a review).

Click through to read the full post

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You have until June 15 to submit to NCTE's Donald H. Graves Writing Award. Learn more about it here.

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Steve Zemelman has been diligently blogging after the release of his newest book From Inquiry To Action. This week he looked at a school in Vermont that shares governance with its students:

Through surveys, committee meetings, and submission of proposals to be voted on, students take part in developing policies and practices in the school. They’ve worked on staff hiring, schedule changes, student reviews of their teachers, and formats for student discussion of issues in the school. They participate not by happenstance but with leadership training from an organization called Up for Learning. Students now hold 5 of the 14 positions on the school leadership team.

Click through to read the full post

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And Rebekah O'Dell concluded her experiment with quitting grading. We've linked to her first two posts (first one here and second one here) so it's exciting to read Rebekah's final thoughts:

Many of my hopes for this project were realized — as I gave up bits of my control, students found their voice in the classroom and in their writing. Students became risk-takers in all the best ways. They accounted for their mess-ups and  for their enormous victories. They learned to tell me what they needed.

Click through to read the full reflection

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That's it! Be sure to check back next week for another round of links. If you have a link or a blog, be sure to mention them in the comments below. You can also email them to us or tweet at us. We're pretty available over here. Cheers to your weekend!

*Photo by Alex Siale


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