Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for the Week of January 17–23

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These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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For The Atlantic, Melinda Anderson wrote about teaching history through a social justice lens, citing author Sonia Nieto:

In her book Language, Culture, and Teaching, the multicultural educator and author Sonia Nieto writes that schools in attempting to make King “palatable to the mainstream … have made [him] a milquetoast.” Nieto notes that it is rare for teachers to explore King’s “consistent opposition to the Vietnam War [and rebuke] of unbridled capitalism,” ignoring the breadth of his protests.

Click through to read "Teaching MLK’s Life—The Man, Not the Myth"

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Kristi Mraz wrote about how being mindful of charity throughout the year can build a habit of giving among students:

My kindergarten team mobilized and we contacted area charities that serve homeless animals, sick children and adults, the elderly, the homeless, and UNICEF. Each teacher took a charity close to their heart, and kids from all classes signed up for one of the charities based on their passion. Every Friday we meet for an hour or so and do work.

Click through to read "If You Aren’t Making it Better, You Might Be Making it Worse"

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You may remember that Rebekah O'Dell quit grading her students' work. She wrote an update:

Even better than a greater volume of feedback, though, I find myself free to give more honest feedback. Sometimes, it’s downright blunt. But because my students are convinced that I am on their side, I find I can tell them the truth.

Click through to read "So, I Quit Grading — Part II Update"

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Dan Callahan advocates for a kind of experiential professional development:

Choosing a format for your PD is a test: do you believe in what you’re saying? If so, you need to make sure that the explicit message, the content, is closely matched by the implicit message, which is the format of instruction. It’s the opportunity for a school to not just transmit expectations for teachers, but to model expectations for teachers.

Click through to read "PD Formats as a reflection of a community’s values #edchat"

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Applications are now open for the new class of Heinemann Fellows. Become a part of a small group of educators who exhibit exceptional promise for concentrated, enhanced pedagogy. This talented fellowship of individuals will pursue the shared goal of advancing the teaching profession. Application deadline is February 15, 2016 (11:59 p.m. eastern time)

Click here to apply

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That's it! Be sure to check back next week for another round of links. If you have a link or a blog, be sure to mention them in the comments below. You can also email them to us or tweet at us. We're pretty available over here. Cheers to your weekend!

*Photo by Skyler Smith

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