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Dedicated to Teachers


Your Heinemann Link Round-Up for February 14–20

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These links are interviews with educators, posts from our authors' and friends' blogs, and any interesting, newsworthy item from the past seven days. Check back each week for a new round of finds!

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On his blog, The Learning Kaleidoscope, Andrew Gael (@bkdidact) wrote about creating accessibility in math for all students:

Unfortunately, the idea of intervention is inextricably linked to deficit thinking and the belief that students with disabilities are not “normal.” I can’t help but disagree with this. Concepts like neurodiversity and presumed competence provide a much more equitable stance on how students with disabilities should be viewed and treated in the school environment. With this in mind, here are two effective lesson planning guides to increase access to rich mathematics for students with disabilities in your classroom.

Click through to read the full post

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NPR interviewed an expert on introverts, and discussed what teachers can do to support our quieter, more insular friends:

What indeed are the right ways to think about class participation? And are we over-evaluating as an educational culture? We overvalue the person who raises their hand all the time. Why is that important? Do we overvalue in quantity, as opposed to quality, of participation? Are there ways to think about class participation differently? Like we [at Quiet Revolution] have been encouraging schools to think in terms of classroom engagement rather than participation. Take a more holistic way of looking at how a child is engaging with this material or with their classmates.

Click through to read the full piece

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February 17 was Digital Learning Day. Author Kristin Ziemke took to her blog to celebrate:

What a momentous time it is to be a teacher and a student as we have new opportunities to engage all learners. As you celebrate the power of technology this week, here are a few texts that you can pair with digital learning to AMPLIFY student thinking!

Click here to watch the video

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That's it! Be sure to check back next week for another round of links. If you have a link or a blog, be sure to mention them in the comments below. You can also email them to us or tweet at us. We're pretty available over here. Cheers to your weekend!

*Photo by Fré Sonneveld

Posted by: Digital EditorPublished:

Topics: Video, Digital Learning, Education, Education Policy, Heinemann, Link Round-Up, NPR, Rebekah O'Dell, Kristin Ziemke, Portsmouth Public Library

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