Category Archives: Writing

Remembering Dr. Rozlyn Linder

Today the educational community mourns the loss of an important and beloved voice. Dr. Rozlyn Linder passed away on Thursday, December 14th. Roz leaves behind her husband, Chris, and their two daughters. She once wrote of her family: “you are all my favorite authors, and I love everything you write.”

Roz worked tirelessly to effect change in education. She loved watching students grow as learners and watching teachers grow as professionals. She was a literacy specialist, a blogger, and a high-demand consultant. She had a gift of helping colleagues take complicated research and turn it into classroom-ready teaching ideas. Her books, The Big Book of Details and the bestselling Chart Sense series, have helped countless teachers and students to grow as readers and writers.
 
Roz was truly remarkable in many ways — her brilliant ideas, her understanding of people, her devotion to kids, her kindness, her sense of joy, her humility, her professional generosity, her hard work, and her devotion to her family, to name just a few. We at Heinemann are devastated by the loss of our dear friend, but are grateful for the time we had with her, and we celebrate Roz’s life and achievements. Our thoughts and prayers are with her family at this time.

Heinemann Fellow Tricia Ebarvia: “How Inclusive Is Your Literacy Classroom Really?”

In 1981, my family moved eighteen miles from northeast Philadelphia to the suburbs. Because I had just turned five, my parents decided we needed to move into a better school district. This meant moving from a predominantly black neighborhood to a predominantly white one. I didn’t know it then, but it would be my first lesson in how segregation works.

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Sneed B. Collard on The Beauty of Pairing Down

Teaching Nonfiction Revision book coverAdapted from Teaching Nonfiction Revision by Sneed B. Collard III & Vicki Spandel

I have a confession: I love to cut. Almost nothing pleases me more than to read through a manuscript and find a sentence, a paragraph, a page – entire chapters – that can be placed under the guillotine and dispatched into history once and for all. My general rule of thumb? If I can’t cut at least a quarter of my first draft then I’m not doing my job. 

Fortunately, the majority of early drafts contain more fat than Iowa-raised bacon. Let’s talk about Texas Chainsaw Massacre-style cuts – you know, hacking off large sections of your manuscript to make it better. How do you know where to begin? 

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Does Your Writing Assessment Help Writers or Pac-Mans?

Reimagining Writing Assessment Maja Wilson book cover

The following is adapted from Reimaging Writing Assessment: From Scales to Stories by Maja Wilson.

I was mostly disinterested in the Atari that my brother got for Christmas in the late 1970s; the excruciatingly slow back-and-forth of Pong bored me. But when Pac-Man was released in 1982, I was intrigued; fleeing a ghost made sense to me. Still, I was confused by Pac-Man’s motivation when it came all to those wafers. One after another, screen after screen, he just kept gobbling them up.

“Why is Pac-Man always so hungry?” I asked my brother while awaiting my turn at the joystick.

His explanation was offered with an exasperated eye roll, “He isn’t hungry. You get a point for each one.”

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Incorporating Field Research into Writing Instruction

Writing Instruction

Adapted from Teaching Nonfiction Revision by Sneed B. Collard III,  and Vicki Spandel

Inexperienced writers often consider research a waste of time. Rather than reading books, watching a documentary, or talking to an expert, they prefer to dive into writing like a penguin chasing a sardine. The problem with this approach is that a writer may dash off a rousing first paragraph only to find she doesn't know enough about her topic to add even one more good line. Thoroughly investigating a topic can solve this problem — and do much, much more. 

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It’s Not You, It’s the Tool

Reimagining Writing Assessment Maja Wilson book cover

The following is adapted from Reimagining Writing Assessment by Maja Wilson

Good news: if you feel like you’re bashing your head into a brick wall as you try to make assessment work for you, generate data for the common district assessment, prep students for the SAT, and satisfy your institution’s accreditation mandates, take heart. It’s not you. Mainstream writing assessment tools are incapable of doing what we want them to do. That’s because the system that shaped these tools works at cross-purposes with our best intentions as knowledgeable teachers, invested writers, and compassionate human beings who teach for a more inclusive democracy. I desperately wish it were possible to simultaneously honor these intentions and appease the powers that be. The knowledge that you can’t serve two feuding masters, however, can be a relief.

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