Category Archives: Poetry

How Can The Writing Strategies Book Help With Your Own Writing Goals This Summer?

brad-neathery-258926 (1)photo: Brad Neathery

Jennifer Serravallo's The Writing Strategies Book offers help for all steps in the writing process, and while it is intended for grades K–8, we find ourselves turning to it regularly to find new ways of thinking, refining, and sharpening our own writing.  Have you made a goal of writing more over the summer? Is it somewhat daunting? overwhelming? terrifying?

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Your One Stop Shop for Recent Podcast Highlights

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Each week on The Heinemann Podcast we bring you concise, relevant and thought-provoking interviews with Heinemann authors and educators in the field. We know teachers are very busy people and it can be hard to keep up with all of your favorite authors, so, as we wrap up another school year we thought you might enjoy a recap of some recent Heinemann Podcast highlights. Enjoy!  

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Teacher Appreciation: Georgia Heard Reflects on The Great Advice of a Teacher

Here, Georgia Heard sends out thanks to a special teacher she had while studying at Columbia, who offered some advice that made a world of difference. 

 

 

 

 

 

Georgia Heard is the author of Heart Maps: Helping Students Create and Craft Authentic Writing.


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5 Ways to Use Liberation Literacies in Your Classroom: Practical Strategies

el_colors2-copyThis week on the Heinemann blog, we’re sharing a series on Language in the Classroom. The series was inspired by an article published by NPR on Sunday, Oct. 23, 2016, on the ways we teach English Learners in our country. While the NPR article was specific to English Learners, our hope is to use that as a jumping off point to broader topics of language instruction in the classroom. Each day this week we will feature articles, excerpts and insights directly from Heinemann authors and affiliates that further the conversation surrounding language diversity in the classroom, the challenges it presents, and what we know works.


In the first part of this two-part blog, Jamilia Lyiscott introduced liberation literacies pedagogy. You can find it here.


5 Ways to Use Liberation Literacies in Your Classroom: Practical Strategies

By Jamila Lyiscott


Begin the year with a Literate Identity Assessment of each student 

One of the goals of Liberation Literacies as a pedagogical framework is for students and teachers to find and employ agency within the stifling constraints of most classrooms, such as the pressures of teaching to the test. Within Liberation Literacies pedagogy teachers challenge the goals of assessments in their classrooms so that alongside the mandate of rigid exams are a series of assessments beginning on the first day of school to better understand the background knowledge, interests, and learning needs of each student as necessary for shaping curriculum. A Literate Identity Assessment at the beginning of the year can include the following prompt along with one or two others:

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Liberation Literacies: Teaching for Social Justice

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This week on the Heinemann blog, we’re sharing a series on Language in the Classroom. The series was inspired by an article published by NPR on Sunday, Oct. 23, 2016, on the ways we teach English Learners in our country. While the NPR article was specific to English Learners, our hope is to use that as a jumping off point to broader topics of language instruction in the classroom. Each day this week we will feature articles, excerpts and insights directly from Heinemann authors and affiliates that further the conversation surrounding language diversity in the classroom, the challenges it presents, and what we know works.


Liberation Literacies: Teaching for Social Justice 

By Jamila Lyiscott


Students: “Miss, we can’t be speakin’ in class like we speak in the hood. We leave that stuff at the door”

Me: “Why?”

Students: “‘Cause it’s not proper”

Me: “Why?”

Students: “‘Cause….”  

“I refuse to accept a world where my language is deemed worthless in the classroom while it clearly has the power to garner billions for a private corporation.” —Me

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A Heart Maps Twitter Chat with Georgia Heard

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On Thursday evening (Oct.20), Georgia Heard joined Dr. Mary Howard, author of Good to Great: Focusing on the Literacy Work That Matters, to discuss Heard's new book Heart Maps: Helping Students Create and Craft Authentic WritingFor decades Georgia Heard has guided students into more authentic writing experiences by using heart maps to explore what we all hold inside: feelings, passions, vulnerabilities, and wonderings. 

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