Category Archives: Literacy

Online Discount for NCTE17 Now Through November 26th!

Heinemann Online NCTE Discount

During the convention, all professional books on sale in the booth come with a 30% discount and free shipping. Even if you can't be at NCTE, you can still use the discount!

All ***online*** orders of professional books from November 17 until November 26 will receive the same discount off of the list price and shipping rate when you use code "NCTE17" at checkout (again: online orders only).

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Everything You’ll Need to Know to Find Heinemann At NCTE 2017!

Find Heinemann at NCTE 17

From November 16 to 19, Heinemann will be at the National Council of Teachers of English’s 2017 conference in St. Louis! Here now is everything you need to know about our presence at #NCTE17: The First Chapter. Details on our online discount are below.

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PLC Series: Inquiry Honors Student Thinking

Welcome back to the Heinemann Professional Development Professional Learning Community (PLC) series. We are excited to present a new format for the 2017-2018 year! 

Each month, we'll share 2 posts designed to provoke thinking and discussion, through a simple framework, incorporating mini-collections of linked content into your professional development time. 

This month, our posts will invite us to welcome curiosity, inquiry, and action for our classrooms and school communities. 

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“It's called "wayfinding"… it's not just sails and knots, it's seeing where you're going in your mind. Knowing where you are by knowing where you've been.”  —Maui in Disney’s Moana (2016)
 

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To understand how to authentically bring the cycle of inquiry to your students, we need to reflect upon how this process looks in our adult lives. What types of questions do we ask? When? Where do we go for information? How do we deal with roadblocks? What does it look like to synthesize and share what we learned?

Jot down a memory you have where you wondered something specific and pursued an answer a question—could be a two-minute Google search or a longer-term experience. Be sure to list how you investigated (alone, with others, online, print material etc), how you determined which information was relevant, important, and valid, and then what did you do with it. Did you post on social media? Write about it? Call someone? Simply exhale and move on?

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Helping Students Bring Beliefs into Writing

Helping Students Bring Beliefs into Writing

The following is adapted from Poems are Teachers: How Poetry Strengthens Writing in All Genres by Amy Ludwig VanDerwater


Many texts grow from idea-and-belief-soil. Writers write about what they believe is important, what they believe is wrong, what they long to preserve. Editorial writers, reviewers, and cartoonists lay their beliefs bare on newsprint, greeting sleepy morning readers with coffee and opinion: Where is the hottest new restaurant in town? For whom should I vote? What’s up with concussions in youth sports?

National Public Radio featured a show titled This I Believe for many years, and at the website thisibelieve.org, you will find hundreds of belief essays by people of all ages and walks of life, essays about everything from attending funerals to being kind to the pizza dude.

In her book Writing to Change the World (2007), Mary Pipher asserts, “Writers can inspire a kinder, fairer, more beautiful world, or incite selfishness, stereotyping, and violence. Writers can unite people or divide them”

When we write, we nudge change, and it is our responsibility to think about what kind of writing change agents we wish to be. Which beliefs do we hold dear enough to share?

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Ways to Support All Readers in Our Classrooms K-8

calkclasslib611px21Written by Anna Gratz Cockerille

Because of its deliberately simple and predictable structure, reading workshop allows teachers to adapt their instruction to meet students’ needs in the most responsive of ways. There are few topics that matter more than responsive teaching. Certainly, no two learners are the same, so no one curriculum could possibly meet all learners’ needs. Nowhere in the curriculum is this more true than in reading.

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Katherine Bomer on Amy Ludwig VanDerwater’s Poems Are Teachers

Poems Are Teachers

Amy’s grand title, Poems Are Teachers: How Studying Poetry Strengthens Writing in All Genres, names the promise of this book, and every ravishing word thereafter supports that thesis and never lets us down. Amy convinces us that devoting time to deep study and practice of the specific features and techniques of poetry will elevate any type of prose, and we should determine to make plenty of space for poem reading and writing in our classrooms.

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