Category Archives: Assessment

Aligning Teacher and Admin Goals to Get The Most Out of Evaluation

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Teacher evaluation can be tough for everyone involved. And in the context of literacy instruction, teachers and administrators oftentimes are not on the same page when it comes to understanding what good literacy instruction looks like, and what criteria to set for evaluation.

In Making Teacher Evaluation Work, Rachael Gabriel and Sarah Woulfin examine the roles of teachers, teacher leaders, coaches, and principals in supporting high-quality literacy instruction in the context of accountability and evaluation policy. 

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How Do I Use Math In Practice With Other Math Programs?

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Math in Practice can be used with nearly any math program or approach.  To help you match your instruction with the books, we've created crosswalks to several commonly used math approaches and programs. These crosswalks are available for each grade level, and cover:

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Congratulations to Cris Tovani, Recipient of the 2017 Adolescent Literacy Thought Leader Award

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At the International Literacy Association annual conference this past weekend, author, veteran teacher, staff developer, nationally known consultant Cris Tovani was awrded the Adolescent Literacy Thought Leader Award. Cris is the author of I Read It But I Don’t Get It, Do I Really Have to Teach Reading? So, What do They Really Know? and most recently is coauthor of No More Telling as Teaching. Since the announcement, many educators, authors, and friends have taken to Twitter to express their excitement and congratulations to Cris:

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This is What Segregation Looks Like, and How Heinemann Fellow Dr. Kim Parker is Working to Change It

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I teach at Cambridge Rindge and Latin high school. Rindge sits in the shadow of Harvard University—one of the best institutions for higher learning in the world. Yet, despite many who insist that my school’s diversity and opportunity are afforded to all students, I know otherwise. Here, students begin the ninth grade on one of two tracks: the (misnamed) College Prep track or the Honors track. The College Prep (CP) track (or “Colored People” track as some students unofficially call it) serves students of color, students with disabilities, students of lower socioeconomic class, and others. The Honors track tends to include students who are white, middle or upper class, and who have parents who are actively involved in their educations.

Students experience education differently depending on their track designation.

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Looking at the new ESSA, New Issues in Education and the Newest Work in the CCSS: The Good and the Bad

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by Anna Gratz Cockerille

The author of Improving Schools from Within, Roland Barth, claims that one can measure the health of a school by the number of elephants in the room. By this he means that when there are whispered conversations in parking lots and behind closed classroom doors, and when there is a feeling of “us-against-them,” and when one new initiative comes down the pike after another before the last ones were understood or embraced, a school’s health suffers. But when there is openness and frank conversation about what is truly best for the children of a school, the school’s health can grow. 

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What is Math in Practice?

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“What is Math in Practice?” We get that a lot. It might be more important to first talk about why Math in Practice.

Sometimes we look back to the “good old days” of teaching math with rose-colored glasses. But did everyone learn and love mathematics in those classrooms? What do you remember about math class when you were the student? What was a typical assignment? What did your classroom look like and sound like? As I listen to teachers across the country, I am struck by the similarity of their experiences as they recall:

  • lots of memorizing
  • long worksheets
  • silent practice
  • a teacher telling how to do it
  • one right answer
  • one way to get the answer
  • no group work
  • no manipulatives.

We know that one of the biggest changes in the teaching of math is a new definition of proficiency. Computation skills are still important, but it takes more than that. We want our students to understand why math works.

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