Author Archives: Frances Lown

Rethinking Math Homework, a Twitter Chat with Sue O’Connell

Math Homework

 


In order to better determine how people really feel about math homework, Math in Practice lead author Sue O'Connell hosted an #elemmathchat Twitter chat in order to open up the discussion on math homework. In this Twitter Chat, O'Connell encouraged educators from across the country to let their memories associated with math homework be heard, fond or otherwise. Below, you can follow along with the conversation. 

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A Special NCTE-Edition Heinemann Podcast Roundup

NCTE17 Heinemann Podcast Roundup

Overwhelmed by the sheer number of inspiring Heinemann authors who attended this year's National Council of Teachers of English conference? So are we– in the best way. Whether you were able to attend the conference or not, below we've compiled some of our favorite Heinemann podcasts with authors who presented at this year's NCTE so you can listen from anywhere to learn more. Enjoy! 

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Helping Struggling Learners to Show Understanding

Supporting Struggling Learners book cover

Allowing students to show understanding in multiple forms plays off of one of three universal design for learning principles — incorporating multiple means of expression. For a variety of reasons, expressing understanding is hard for many struggling learners. Sometimes, a learner has trouble putting thoughts to words and is unclear of what he or she wants to say. Other times, the learner knows what he or she wants to say but has trouble expressing it clearly and succinctly. And in other cases, a learner is taking time to process input and just needs time to express understanding. Regardless, we serve all our learners well when we provide students with multiple ways to demonstrate understanding. 

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Tom Newkirk on The Emotional Complexities of Teaching

Tom Newkirk Embarrassment book cover

"I'll go first", says Thomas Newkirk in his new book, Embarrassment and the Emotional Underlife of Learning. Through sharing his own stories of frustration and the performative anxieties of teaching, Newkirk sheds light on his emotional journey as an educator. He opens a discussion about the emotional realities of teaching by delving into a newfound discussion space. 

Here, Newkirk discusses how teachers can create this new space with students by giving them time, and how allowing time to listen invites the opportunity to discuss and solve problems more slowly in order to overcome roadblocks within their own work.

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